Programme

08:30 – 10:00

Registration

10:00 – 10:15

Welcome

10:15 – 11:00

Plenary Lecture: The History of Gray's Anatomy

Emeritus Professor Susan Standring, Kings College London, UK.

Sponsored by the Anatomical Society

11:15 – 13:15

Parallel Session A

Exploration of the evolution of human form has come a long way from hypotheses focusing solely upon sparse osteological remains. New approaches combining techniques from advances in visualization modalities, computer modeling, non-human primate biology, developmental biology, forensic science, pathobiology, and behavioral studies, to mention but some, have greatly enhanced our ability to “reconstruct” the anatomy and implied behaviors of our ancestors. This Symposium will explore the above, looking at the reconstruction of regions as diverse as the cranium, respiratory and digestive tracts, and sexual anatomy and behaviors. How varied systems have changed through human history will be discussed.

In this symposium, the cell biology of desmosomes with functional implications under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions will be highlighted in different tissues and cell types. The symposium is a follow-up meeting to the symposium held at the IFAA meeting 2014 in Beijing. We plan to have 5 keynote talks on the structure and function of the desmosome-keratin complex in general as well as on its function in skin, heart muscle, intestinal epithelium and cancer cells with respect to tissue-specific diseases. The talks will cover the role of desmosomes in the pathogenesis of pemphigus, cardiomyopathy, Crohn's disease and oncogenesis. In addition, we will have short talks presenting recent data on the different sub-topics.

This symposium is supported by Elsevier.

 

Overview:

  • Introduction - Structure of Adhesive Contacts 
  • The Desmosome-Keratin Complex as a Dynamic Adhesion Structure
  • Desmoplakin - Role for Desmosome Function and Signaling
  • Desmosomes in the Epidermis and Pemphigus Pathogenesis
  • Dsg1 Deficiency Causes Lethal Skin Blistering in Mice
  • The Role of p38MAPK in Pemphigus is Different in Human Epidermis and Mucosa

Anatomy is a key component of medical knowledge. However, all too often, research in the anatomical sciences has difficulty bridging the gap between study findings and actual patient impact. Therefore, the concept of translational research in the anatomical sciences is important for maintaining relevance of anatomy in a modern world and in understanding the best ways of maximizing the influence of anatomical studies for patient care. The symposium will have world experts in this field convey their experience and advice on how to establish an anatomical laboratory dedicated to translational research. Additionally, the speakers will provide guidance on how to publish such data in the medical literature so that it has the greatest potential impact on improving patient care and lowering patient morbidity.

 

Overview:

  • Reverse Translational Research in Anatomy; Examples of Direct Clinical Impact From Anatomical Feasibility
  • Engaging Clinicians as an Anatomist; Designing Studies Related to Clinical Anatomy
  • How to Publish Your Clinically Related Anatomical Research
  • Bridging the Gap Between Medical Need and Anatomical Study
  • How to go From Clinician to Anatomical Researcher

Background: For today’s students and trainees, social media is frequently one of their preferred means of communication and information sourcing. Consequently, anatomy educators have attempted to meet their students’ needs by incorporating more social media-based educational tools into teaching. However, due to the constant evolution and change of social media platforms there is limited information regarding the efficacy of these sites as educational options. Examining the effects of social media for education is a relatively new field of research and it remains to be seen how social media can best be incorporated into anatomy education.

Structure: This workshop is suitable for anyone who would like to learn more about using social media. The first part of the workshop will involve the organisers sharing their personal experiences and research on using social media in anatomy education (Kirsten Brown – Instagram, Mike Pascoe – Snapchat, Iain Keenan - Twitter, Instagram and Facebook).

Throughout the workshop attendees will have the opportunity to participate in small group activities using Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat and Facebook, and experiment with how these platforms can be used as adjuncts for anatomy education.

The next part of the work shop will involve the organisers sharing their personal experiences and research findings on the benefits of using social media as a professional networking tool (Amanda Meyer, Jane Holland, Iain Keenan).

The final part of the workshop will examine the challenges of using social media and considerations for developing a professional online identity. A peer observation exercise of the social media profiles of attendees will be one of the activities covered allowing attendees to learn more about their online presence. The importance of online professionalism within anatomy will also be demonstrated. (Danielle Royer,Catherine Hennessy)

 

The recognized goals of anatomical education have broadened throughout the last decades to include not only the student’s acquisition of knowledge of the structure and function of the human body, but also of professional competencies in self-awareness, reflective practice, and teamwork. The importance of these topics is increasingly illuminated from within dynamic curricula and a changing society, providing challenges for educators who are continually presented with emerging educational and ethical considerations. This symposium will focus on new experiences and studies that support the pursuit and integration of professional competency as a core element of anatomical education, and at the same time highlight the emergence of new challenges within the nexus of interactions between anatomical educators, medical students, body donors and society. Presentations will address various aspects of these relationships.

Findings from the most comprehensive study of dissecting room experience on professionalism and ethical attitudes of medical students will be reported. New insights on body donors will be addressed through investigations of different societies’ perceptions of anatomical body procurement. An entirely new set of ethical questions surrounding body donors is revealed in ethical discussions of a new source of anatomical bodies from persons availing themselves of medical assistance in dying in Ontario, Canada. Likewise, there is an increasing need of discussion focused on the use of digital technologies in anatomy and anatomical education. Finally, the practical implementation of a learning environment in anatomy conducive to the acquisition of professional competencies in an integrated medical curriculum will be discussed. This two-hour symposium brings together experts from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, USA and the UK to discuss findings and insights that may guide the development of anatomy education in upcoming years.

This symposium is supported by the IFAA-FICEM

Overview:

  • Anatomy: a mirror for society and a challenge to normative ethics
  • What are people’s “concerns” when contemplating body donation?
  • An Ethical Dilemma? How donor dissection influences medical students’ perceptions of ethics
  • Euthanasia and Body Bequeathal
  • Ethical Implications of 3D Printing of Human Materials in Anatomy
  • The Impact of Digital Technology on Anatomy Education
  • Creating a Learning Environment in Anatomy Conducive to the Acquisition of Professional Competencies in Medicine: Experiences at Harvard Medical School

Overview:

  • The effect of P53 cofactor JMY on neuronal radial migration in developing mouse brain.
  • Regulation of liver regeneration during chronic liver injuries.
  • Non-coding RNAs in Tissue Regeneration: From Stem Cell Regulation to Environment Communication.
  • Complex post-translational modification regulations in spermatogenesis.
  • The repair effect of bone marrow neural crest derived cells on the peripheral nerve defect based on the tissue engineered nerve.
  • Construction of small diameter tissue engineered blood vessel in vivo from endothelialization to neurotization.

Dr C. Smith leads the symposium by introducing Disruptive and Constructive Innovation and how this can be applied to anatomy education. The symposium then presents four world leading examples of innovation in anatomy that spans the high-low-no tech Dr S. Border UK, will explain ‘National Neuroanatomy Competition- pedagogy through partnership’, Prof. J McBride USA, will discuss ‘Exploring the application of extended reality in anatomy education’, Dr A. Zumwalt USA, will present her work on ‘ Using eye tracking to understand learning in the anatomical sciences and Prof. T Wilkinson UK will talk about ‘The old and the new - teaching with Thiel and messing with mixed reality. The symposium will challenge if these innovations are disruptive or constructive in nature. The symposium will explore how we as educators use and evaluate the impact of our innovations. The symposium will allow for discussion and will end with a Panel discussion including the speakers and Professor Pawlina, Editor in Chief of Anatomical Sciences Education. Sponsored by Anatomical Sciences Education- this leading symposium has chosen cutting edge innovations to showcase the variety of innovations occurring in the discipline and more importantly what these mean for students learning.

This symposium is supported by Anatomical Sciences Education and asks the important question of: Anatomy Innovation- what does it mean to students and educators?


Overview:

  • Introduction - Disruptive and Constructive Innovation
  • National Neuroanatomy Competition- pedagogy through partnership
  • Exploring the application of extended reality in anatomy education
  • Using eye tracking to understand learning in the anatomical sciences
  • The old and the new - teaching with Thiel and messing with mixed reality

13:15 – 14:30

Lunch, posters and exhibition

13:15 – 14:30

IFAA General Assembly Registration

14:30 – 16:30

Parallel Session B

 

The internationalisation of Higher Education plays a significant role in ensuring graduates can compete in a global market and is an enabler of international trade. Internationalisation of education has led to an emerging trend of universities collaborating across international borders, of foreign universities operating within host countries, and of using technology to enable international online delivery of courses. It can be argued that embedded in this trend is the concept of a knowledge society. This concept is underpinned by dissemination of knowledge that will improve the human condition. Importantly, the concept of the knowledge society extends beyond attracting students and international fees to continuous improvement through innovation that supports lifelong learning, knowledge development and knowledge sharing. It is as multi-faceted as it is messy intersecting with various higher education agendas, challenging academic roles, and adapting to diverse cultures. It challenges concepts of knowledge, critical thinking and the accepted traits of the ‘global’ student/academic leader.

Particularly in healthcare education, anatomy often takes a central or leading role in sharing knowledge and responding to changing trends in higher education. In this symposium, we posit that anatomists have embraced the role of fostering both internationalisation and the development of a knowledge society and is poised to be a significant player in leading, and/or supporting the internationalisation process.

A number of institutions with well-established international connections have come together to present a broad array of experiences that will promote discussion, further collaboration and hopefully inspire others to look beyond their local environment.

This symposium will challenge the role of the discipline in sharing and developing knowledge through international interactions within the context of:

  • the academic leader: creator of new knowledge and its applications,
  • socio-cultural development: promoting inter-cultural understanding, equity and equality,
  • economic progress: preparing students for employment in a global context
  •  

    This symposium is supported by the Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists (ANZACA) 

    Immunological barriers form biological, mechanical, and chemical lines of defence which quietly, but vigorously protect the body from infection. These barriers include skin, tears, mucus, cilia, stomach acid, and “friendly” bacteria. If these barriers are compromised, pathogens or other foreign agents can penetrate the body and cause infection, sepsis, and even death.

    This symposium will review the histological and physiological characteristics of these barriers (mainly skin) and discuss educational resources available to assist faculty in teaching these concepts. In addition, integration of current discoveries on wound healing, novel regulators of this complex process, as well as the role these “friendly” bacteria (microbiome) play in tissue repair will be referenced.

     

    This symposium is supported by the American Association for Anatomy 

    Overview:

    • How to teach histology of barriers
    • Wound healing and the microbiome
    • Myeloid cells and tissue repair

    In this symposium, the cell biology of desmosomes with functional implications under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions will be highlighted in different tissues and cell types. The symposium is a follow-up meeting to the symposium held at the IFAA meeting 2014 in Beijing. We plan to have 5 keynote talks on the structure and function of the desmosome-keratin complex in general as well as on its function in skin, heart muscle, intestinal epithelium and cancer cells with respect to tissue-specific diseases. The talks will cover the role of desmosomes in the pathogenesis of pemphigus, cardiomyopathy, Crohn's disease and oncogenesis. In addition, we will have short talks presenting recent data on the different sub-topics.

    This symposium is supported by Elsevier.

     

    Overview:   

    • Desmosomes in cardiomyocytes and Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy
    • Dsg2 and heart disease
    • Regulation of cardiomyocyte cohesion by autonomic nervous signalling
    • Desmosomes in the intestinal epithelium and Crohn's disease
    • Desmosomes in Cancer

    The proposed workshop will bring together anatomists from around the world to share their interests in international work and Global Health (GH).

    The first portion of the workshop includes presentations from 7 anatomists of different backgrounds and countries – who will showcase snapshots of a broad variety of international projects and their contributions to GH and GH education. They will share how they established, built, maintained their partnerships/programs, obtained institutional support, and funded their work.

    The second portion of the workshop includes a hands-on “build your own GH program” exercise, where anatomists can meet in breakout sessions to address topics such as, how to 1) build a global network, 2) make the network/program sustainable, 3) involve students, 4) involve key stakeholders, 5) utilize modern technology, 6) obtain financial support, and 7) identify challenges, avoid pitfalls, and prevent mistakes.

    At the end of the workshop participants can team up to establish new collaborations and projects in GH.

    The speakers hope that the workshop will inspire other anatomists to work on GH issues. We desire to start an international GH support movement, anchored in the anatomical societies, and will discuss how associations like the IFAA can be involved with GH initiatives - thus, providing a new role for the field of Anatomy worldwide.

    Overview:

    • Brain structure differences between Chinese and Caucasian populations
    • Human brainnetome atlas and its applications
    • Quantitative radiomic features of the hippocampus for Alzheimer’s disease: a multi-site MRI study
    • Multivariate classification analysis on the depressive disorders using connectivity measures
    • Comparative study of anatomical structures in the urogenital triangle between young adult males and females

    Anatomy teachers use a plethora of assessment forms, mostly chosen by means of habit, tradition or technical possibilities. Sometimes they are not chosen at all but decided at a program level. Awareness about validity issues in assessment of anatomical competence leaves room for development. Most teachers ask questions about ‘what they need to know’, ‘will this student be a safe practioners next year?’. Such questions are probably based on a set of objectives, insuring some content validity, ensuring there is a clear demarcation between a pass and a fail. One of the big questions that remains unanswered is What students ‘do’ to produce an answer to a test questions. This symposium will explore the cognitive steps that students go through each time they face an anatomy assessment and what we, as educators, can do to assist students and produce valid assessments.

    The workshop will be introduced concisely by the three organizers. Then the participants will actively step in the shoes of students. They will experience their strain (maybe even their anxiety) while answering ‘anatomy’ exam questions about a surprising subject. After this portion of experiential learning, the three organisers will share their views on validity of anatomy assessment from their individual perspective.

    The aim of this workshop is to nurture awareness in anatomy teachers about the cognitive processes in student’s brains while answering exam questions. What do students do to generate the correct answer? For experts (teachers) the processes are quite different than for novices (students). These cognitive processes are key to assessing the validity of traditional and modern assessments methods.

     

    The Anatomy underlying dementias

    16:30 – 17:15

    Tea, posters and exhibition

    16:45 – 18:45

    IFAA General Assembly

    17:15 – 18:00

    Plenary Lecture: Art and Anatomy

    Professor Clive Lee, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and Royal Hibernian Academy of Arts, Dublin, Ireland

    Sponsored by The Anatomical Society