Programme

08:30 – 10:00

Registration

10:00 – 10:15

Welcome

10:15 – 11:00

Plenary Lecture: The History of Gray's Anatomy

Emeritus Professor Susan Standring, Kings College London, UK.

Sponsored by the Anatomical Society

In 1858, two young doctors, Heny Gray and Henry Carter, working at St George’s Hospital in London, produced a book that is now known around the world as Gray’s Anatomy. The longer title, Anatomy Descriptive and Surgical, needed no further explanation: the authors’ objective was to provide ‘an accurate view of the anatomy of the human body’… that a student or surgeon could apply to their clinical practice.Why was their book so popular when it first appeared? Was the harsh criticism of Henry Gray in 1859 justified? How has Gray’s Anatomy changed over the last 161 years? My lecture will address these and other questions and will cover the ’inception, consolidation, stasis and renaissance’ of this famous book.

11:15 – 13:15

Parallel Session A

Prof C. Smith leads the symposium by introducing Disruptive and Constructive Innovation and how this can be applied to anatomy education. The symposium then presents four world leading examples of innovation in anatomy that spans the high-low-no tech Dr S. Border UK, will explain ‘National Neuroanatomy Competition- pedagogy through partnership’, Prof. J McBride USA, will discuss ‘Exploring the application of extended reality in anatomy education’, Dr A. Zumwalt USA, will present her work on ‘ Using eye tracking to understand learning in the anatomical sciences’ and Prof. T Wilkinson UK will talk about ‘The old and the new - teaching with Thiel and messing with mixed reality. The symposium will challenge if these innovations are disruptive or constructive in nature. The symposium will explore how we as educators use and evaluate the impact of our innovations. The symposium will allow for discussion and will end with a Panel discussion including the speakers and Professor Pawlina, Editor in Chief of Anatomical Sciences Education. Sponsored by Anatomical Sciences Education- this leading symposium has chosen cutting edge innovations to showcase the variety of innovations occurring in the discipline and more importantly what these mean for students learning.

 
This symposium is supported by Anatomical Sciences Education and asks the important question of: Anatomy Innovation- what does it mean to students and educators?

Chaired by Claire Smith, Wojciech Pawlina and Gabrielle Finn*

  • 11:15-11:30 - S011 - Disruptive and constructive innovation - Claire Smith and Wojciech Pawlina
  • 11:30-11:50 - S012 - National Neuroanatomy Competition- pedagogy through partnership - Scott Border, Jonny Stephens and Sam Hall
  • 11:50-12:10 - S013 - Exploring the application of extended reality in anatomy education - Jennifer McBride
  • 12:20-12:40 - S014 - Using eye tracking to understand learning in the anatomical sciences - Ann Zumwalt
  • 12:40-13:00 - S015 - The old and the new - teaching with Thiel and messing with mixed reality - Tracey Wilkinson
  • 13:00-13:15 - Panel discussion
*Anatomical Society chair

 

Chaired by Gerard O'Keeffe*
  • 11:15-11:27 - O001 - mTOR inhibition enhances the neuroprotective effects of C-terminal Mechano Growth Factor peptide on adult rat facial motoneurones - Ian Johnson
  • 11:27-11:39 - O002 - The temporal profiles of the glial roles and neuroimages in APP/PS1 transgenic AD mice - Qionglan Yuan
  • 11:39-11:51 - O003 - Differential expression of CD31 and von Willebrand factor in endothelial cells in different regions of the human brain - Smart Mbagwu
  • 11:51-12:03 - O004 - Mapping the developing and adult human brainstem: genetic neuroanatomy - Gulgun Sengul
  • 12:03-12:15 - O005 - Nerve identity crisis? Catecholaminergic neurons are embedded extensively throughout the peripheral neural substrate. - Thomas Verlinden
  • 12:15-12:27 - O006 - Can the Cingulum get you down? A comparative study of cingula changes and their involvement in depression - Alannah Grealy
  • 12:27-12:39 - O007 - Motor-coordinating effects of Nigella Sativa oil on male mice models of Sub-acute Parkinsonism - Dorcas Taiwo-Ola
  • 12:39-12:51 - O008 - Analysis of the distribution of adrenergic receptors in the cerebral vasculature: implications for Alzheimer’s disease - Miles Frost
  • 12:51-13:03 - O009 - Immune cells at the interfaces of the brain parenchyma with blood and CSF - Anna Planas

*Anatomical Society Chair


Exploration of the evolution of human form has come a long way from hypotheses focusing solely upon sparse osteological remains. New approaches combining techniques from advances in visualization modalities, computer modeling, non-human primate biology, developmental biology, forensic science, pathobiology, and behavioral studies, to mention but some, have greatly enhanced our ability to “reconstruct” the anatomy and implied behaviors of our ancestors. This Symposium will explore the above, looking at the reconstruction of regions as diverse as the cranium, respiratory and digestive tracts, and sexual anatomy and behaviors. How varied systems have changed through human history will be discussed.

Chaired by Kurt Albertine and Imelda McGonnell*

  • S001 - Nature’s great experiment: the development and evolution of the human larynx - Jeffrey Laitman
  • S002 - The Atapuerca sites, at the crossroads of European prehistory - Ignacio Martínez Mendizábal
  • S003 - Audition and communicative capacities in fossil hominins - Mercedes Conde-Valverde
  • S004 - The Sima de los Huesos crania and the origin of the Neandertal brain - Ana Pantoja-Perez

 

In this symposium, the cell biology of desmosomes with functional implications under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions will be highlighted in different tissues and cell types. The symposium is a follow-up meeting to the symposium held at the IFAA meeting 2014 in Beijing. We plan to have 5 keynote talks on the structure and function of the desmosome-keratin complex in general as well as on its function in skin, heart muscle, intestinal epithelium and cancer cells with respect to tissue-specific diseases. The talks will cover the role of desmosomes in the pathogenesis of pemphigus, cardiomyopathy, Crohn's disease and oncogenesis. In addition, we will have short talks presenting recent data on the different sub-topics.

This symposium is supported by Elsevier.

Chaired by Jens Waschke, Friedrich Paulsen and Fabio Quondamatteo*
 
  • 11:15-11:30 - S005 - Structure and function of adhesive contacts - Jens Waschke
  • 11:30-12:00 - S006 - The desmosome-keratin complex as a dynamic adhesion structure - Rudolf Leube
  • 12:00-12:15 - S007 - Desmoplakin - role for desmosome function and signaling - Marie Wanuske
  • 12:15-12:45 - S008 - Desmosomes in the epidermis and pemphigus pathogenesis - Franziska Vielmuth
  • 12:45-13:00 - S009 - Dsg1 deficiency causes lethal skin blistering in mice - Daniela Kugelmann
  • 13:00-13:15 - S010 - The role of p38MAPK in pemphigus is different in human epidermis and mucosa - Desalegn Tadesse Eg
*Anatomical Society chair

Anatomy is a key component of medical knowledge. However, all too often, research in the anatomical sciences has difficulty bridging the gap between study findings and actual patient impact. Therefore, the concept of translational research in the anatomical sciences is important for maintaining relevance of anatomy in a modern world and in understanding the best ways of maximizing the influence of anatomical studies for patient care. The symposium will have world experts in this field convey their experience and advice on how to establish an anatomical laboratory dedicated to translational research. Additionally, the speakers will provide guidance on how to publish such data in the medical literature so that it has the greatest potential impact on improving patient care and lowering patient morbidity.

Chaired by Shane Tubbs and Ross Jones*

  • 11:15-12:00 - S029 - Reverse translational research in anatomy: examples of direct clinical impact from anatomical feasibility studies - Shane Tubbs
  • 12:00-12:20 - S030 - Bridging the gap between medical need and anatomical study - Robert Spinner
  • 12:20-12:40 - S031 - How to publish your clinically related anatomical research - Stephen Carmichael
  • 12:40-13:00 - S032 - Translational and reverse translational research in anatomical sciences - Mario Loukas
  • 13;00-13:15 - S033 - How to go from full-time clinician to full-time anatomical researcher - Joe Iwanaga

*Anatomical Society Chair



 

This workshop is suitable for anyone who would like to learn more about using social media as an educational tool and for professional networking.

For today’s students and trainees, social media isfrequently one of their preferred means of communication and information sourcing.Anatomy educators have attempted to meet their students’ needs byincorporating more social media-basededucational tools into teaching. However,due to the constant evolution and change of social media platforms, there is limited informationregarding the efficacy of these sites as educational options. Examining the effects of socialmedia for education is a relatively new field of research and it remains to be seen how social media can best be incorporated intoanatomy education.

The first part of the workshop will involve the speakers sharing their personal experiences and research on using social media including Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter and Facebook for teaching. Throughout the workshop attendees will have the opportunity to participate in small group activities and experiment with how these platforms can be used as adjuncts for anatomyeducation.

The next part of the workshop will involve the organisers sharing their personal experiences and research findings on the benefits of using social media, particularly Twitter, as a professional networking tool.

The final part of the workshop will examine the challenges of using social media within the field of anatomy including posts containing cadaveric material being shared publicly. Attendees can participate in a peer observation exercise of each other’s social mediaprofiles to learn more about their online presence. Considerations for developing a professional online identity and the importance of online professionalism within anatomy will also be demonstrated. Delegates will be invited to complete a questionnaire regarding their opinions and experiences of using social media in the field of anatomy. 

Chaired by Catherine Hennessy and Scott Border*

  • 11:15-11:20 - Introduction
  • 11:20-11:35 - Evaluating the use of Instagram to supplement undergraduate medical anatomy education - Kirsten Brown
  • 11:35-11:50 - Use of Snapchat in a healthcare profession anatomy course - Mike Pascoe
  • 11:50-12:05 - Social media: Insights for anatomy education from instructor perceptions and usage - Iain Keenan
  • 12:05-12:20 - Conferences – top tips for tweeting - Jane Holland 
  • 12:20-12:35 - Twitter: Collaborations & communities of practice - Amanda Meyer 
  • 12:35-12:50 - @AACAnatomy Twitter account goes live: A sustainable social media model for professional societies - Danielle Royer
  • 12:50-13:05 - Professional and ethical social media use in the field of anatomy - Catherine Hennessy
  • 13:05-13:15 - Panel discussion

The recognized goals of anatomical education have broadened throughout the last decades to include not only the student’s acquisition of knowledge of the structure and function of the human body, but also of professional competencies in self-awareness, reflective practice, and teamwork. The importance of these topics is increasingly illuminated from within dynamic curricula and a changing society, providing challenges for educators who are continually presented with emerging educational and ethical considerations. This symposium will focus on new experiences and studies that support the pursuit and integration of professional competency as a core element of anatomical education, and at the same time highlight the emergence of new challenges within the nexus of interactions between anatomical educators, medical students, body donors and society. Presentations will address various aspects of these relationships.

Findings from the most comprehensive study of dissecting room experience on professionalism and ethical attitudes of medical students will be reported. New insights on body donors will be addressed through investigations of different societies’ perceptions of anatomical body procurement. An entirely new set of ethical questions surrounding body donors is revealed in ethical discussions of a new source of anatomical bodies from persons availing themselves of medical assistance in dying in Ontario, Canada. Likewise, there is an increasing need of discussion focused on the use of digital technologies in anatomy and anatomical education. Finally, the practical implementation of a learning environment in anatomy conducive to the acquisition of professional competencies in an integrated medical curriculum will be discussed. This two-hour symposium brings together experts from Australia, New Zealand, Canada, USA and the UK to discuss findings and insights that may guide the development of anatomy education in upcoming years.

This symposium is supported by the IFAA-FICEM

Chaired by Jon Cornwall, Sabine Hildebrandt and Cecilia Brasset*
  • 11:15-11:20 - Introduction
  • 11:20-11:35 - S016 - Anatomy: a mirror for society and a challenge to normative ethics - Nalini Pather
  • 11:35-11:50 - S017 - What are people’s “concerns” when contemplating body donation? - Tom Farsides and Claire F. Smith
  • 11:50-12:05 - S018 - An ethical dilemma? How donor dissection influences medical students’ perceptions of ethics - Georgina Stephens
  • 12:05-12:20 - S019 - Euthanasia and body bequeathal - Bruce Wainman
  • 12:20-12:35 - S020 - Creating a learning environment in anatomy conducive to the acquisition of professional competencies in medicine: experiences at Harvard Medical School - Sabine Hildebrandt
  • 12:35-12:50 - S021 - The impact of digital technology on anatomy education - Jon Cornwall

*Anatomical Society Chair


In this symposium, we invited seven outstanding young anatomists from China who will focus on the frontier areas of tissue development and regeneration and report on the innovative research progress from basic research to tissue engineering. The topic of this symposium covers the whole research chain of developmental and regenerative medicine, including the mechanisms of non-coding RNA, transcription factor activation and epigenetic regulation, stem cell and tissue regeneration, organ regeneration mechanism of nerve, liver, reproductive system, and tissue engineering technology of blood vessel and nerve. If you are interested in the basic biological mechanisms of development and regeneration, you can follow the reports of Dr. Yue Wang, Dr. Guo-he Tan and Dr. Xue-jiang Guo. They will talk about the regulation of non-coding RNA on stem cells and microenvironment, the effect of transcription factors on neurodevelopment, and the complex epigenetic regulation on spermatogenesis, respectively. If you are engaged in the research of liver, nerve and other organ regeneration, you can also pay attention to the reports of Dr. Peng-yu Huang and Dr. Shang-cheng Xu. They will talk about the mechanism of liver regeneration after injury and brain stem cell activation after neurological diseases. Last but not the least, tissue engineering may be a good way for the potential clinical application of regenerative medicine, we also provide two reports in this field. Dr. Wen Zeng and Dr. Hai-yan Shi will talk about the bionic design and clinical implications of small-caliber tissue-engineered blood vessels, and the stem-cell-related regeneration mechanism in tissue-engineered nerves, respectively. You should not miss this party of young scientists who are interested in the field of tissue development and regeneration.

This symposium is supported by The Young Anatomical Scientists Union of the Chinese Society for Anatomical Sciences (CSAS)

Chaired by Yue Want, Wen Zeng and Stefan Pryborski*

  • 11:15-11:30 - S022 - The effect of P53 cofactor JMY on neuronal radial migration in developing mouse brain. - Guo-He Tan
  • 11:30-11:45 - S023 - Regulation of liver regeneration during chronic liver injuries - Peng-Yu Huang
  • 11:45-12:00 - S024 - Non-coding RNAs in tissue regeneration: from stem cell regulation to environment communication - Yue Wang
  • 12:00-12:15 - S025 - Complex post-translational modification regulations in spermatogenesis. - Xue-Jiang Guo
  • 12:15-12:30 - S026 - The repair effect of bone marrow neural crest derived cells on the peripheral nerve defect based on the tissue engineered nerve. - Hai-Yan Shi
  • 12:30-12:45 - S027 - Construction of small diameter tissue engineered blood vessel in vivo from endothelialization to neurotization. - Wen Zeng
  • 12:45-13:00 - S028 - Abnormal mitochondrial calcium uptake in the brain stem neuron of a mouse model of Leigh’s disease. - Shao-Cheng Xu

*Anatomical Society Chair


Dr C. Smith leads the symposium by introducing Disruptive and Constructive Innovation and how this can be applied to anatomy education. The symposium then presents four world leading examples of innovation in anatomy that spans the high-low-no tech Dr S. Border UK, will explain ‘National Neuroanatomy Competition- pedagogy through partnership’, Prof. J McBride USA, will discuss ‘Exploring the application of extended reality in anatomy education’, Dr A. Zumwalt USA, will present her work on ‘ Using eye tracking to understand learning in the anatomical sciences’ and Prof. T Wilkinson UK will talk about ‘The old and the new - teaching with Thiel and messing with mixed reality. The symposium will challenge if these innovations are disruptive or constructive in nature. The symposium will explore how we as educators use and evaluate the impact of our innovations. The symposium will allow for discussion and will end with a Panel discussion including the speakers and Professor Pawlina, Editor in Chief of Anatomical Sciences Education. Sponsored by Anatomical Sciences Education- this leading symposium has chosen cutting edge innovations to showcase the variety of innovations occurring in the discipline and more importantly what these mean for students learning.

This symposium is supported by Anatomical Sciences Education and asks the important question of: Anatomy Innovation- what does it mean to students and educators?

Chaired by Claire Smith, Wojciech Pawlina and Gabrielle Finn*
  • 11:15-11:30 - S011 - Disruptive and constructive innovation - Claire Smith and Wojciech Pawlina
  • 11:30-11:50 - S012 - National Neuroanatomy Competition- pedagogy through partnership - Scott Border, Jonny Stephens and Sam Hall
  • 11:50-12:10 - S013 - Exploring the application of extended reality in anatomy education - Jennifer McBride
  • 12:20-12:40 - S014 - Using eye tracking to understand learning in the anatomical sciences - Ann Zumwalt
  • 12:40-13:00 - S015 - The old and the new - teaching with Thiel and messing with mixed reality - Tracey Wilkinson
  • 13:00-13:15 - Panel discussion 

13:15 – 14:30

Lunch, posters and exhibition

Posters
Room: 14-16

Posters: 

  • Anatomical Techniques P1-AT1 - P1-AT12
  • Cellular and Molecular Anatomy P1-CM1 - P1-CM37
  • General P1-G1 - P1-G38
  • Microscopic Anatomy P1-MA1 - P1-MA23
  • Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience P1-N1 - P1-N63
 

 

13:15 – 14:30

IFAA General Assembly Delegate Registration

13:20 – 14:20

Sponsored Symposium

First Virtual Reality VR symposium in IFAA ever. Join us in the 3D Organon symposium and learn all about VR technology, how Virtual Reality (VR) in 3D Organon transforms anatomy education, how to set up a VR lab, the most common use cases scenarios and testimony and research about VR in anatomy and healthcare education.

Agenda:

1. VR Technology- Advantages in medical education - Mr. Lewis Chang, HTC Healthcare (DeepQ)

2. How 3D Organon transforms anatomy education - Prof. Athanasios Raikos, CEO of 3D Organon
3. 3D Organon most common use case scenarios - Dr. Panagiota Kordali, COO of 3D Organon
4. 3D Organon in medical education; Testimony and research - Prof. Hung-Ming Chang, Taipei Medical University
5. 3D Organon applied to healthcare professionals education - Mr. Bradley Chesman, Founder/ Director Bundle of Rays, Nurse

 

13:30 – 14:00

Sponsored Workshop

Speaker: Dr Colin Primrose MBChB BSc (Hons)

Centre for Human Anatomy Education, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde, UK

As a result of a partnership between Sectra and Monash University, we have produced a new educational resource to be used in teaching human anatomy: interactive 3D models based on data from CT-scanned prosected specimens.

This talk and demonstration will give a brief history of the production of these models, the benefits it has over traditional anatomical resources, and how it can be used within curricula.

 

 

 

14:30 – 16:30

Parallel Session B

The internationalisation of Higher Education plays a significant role in ensuring graduates can compete in a global market and is an enabler of international trade. Internationalisation of education has led to an emerging trend of universities collaborating across international borders, of foreign universities operating within host countries, and of using technology to enable international online delivery of courses. It can be argued that embedded in this trend is the concept of a knowledge society. This concept is underpinned by dissemination of knowledge that will improve the human condition. Importantly, the concept of the knowledge society extends beyond attracting students and international fees to continuous improvement through innovation that supports lifelong learning, knowledge development and knowledge sharing. It is as multi-faceted as it is messy intersecting with various higher education agendas, challenging academic roles, and adapting to diverse cultures. It challenges concepts of knowledge, critical thinking and the accepted traits of the ‘global’ student/academic leader.

Particularly in healthcare education, anatomy often takes a central or leading role in sharing knowledge and responding to changing trends in higher education. In this symposium, we posit that anatomists have embraced the role of fostering both internationalisation and the development of a knowledge society and is poised to be a significant player in leading, and/or supporting the internationalisation process.

A number of institutions with well-established international connections have come together to present a broad array of experiences that will promote discussion, further collaboration and hopefully inspire others to look beyond their local environment.

This symposium will challenge the role of the discipline in sharing and developing knowledge through international interactions within the context of:

  • the academic leader: creator of new knowledge and its applications,
  • socio-cultural development: promoting inter-cultural understanding, equity and equality,
  • economic progress: preparing students for employment in a global context.
  • This symposium is supported by the Australian and New Zealand Association of Clinical Anatomists (ANZACA) 

    Chaired by Nalini Pather, Quentin Fogg and Abigail Tucker*
     
    • 14:30-14:45 - S034 - Anatomy, challenges and rewards to internationalisation - Nalini Pather and Quentin Fogg
    • 14:45-15:00 - S035 - Internationalisation of education: what do we mean and why is it important? - Helen Nicholson
    • 15:00-15:15 - S036 - Brain drain, brain gain: building bridges in anatomical research across continents - Beverley Kramer
    • 15:15-15:30 - S037 - Delivering the same Medial Curriculum in two different countries - Lakshmi Selvaratnam
    • 15:30-15:45 - S038 - Collaborative development of anatomy workshops for medical, dental, nursing and midwifery students in Cambodia - Jason Ivanusic
    • 15:45-16:00 - S039 - Clinical anatomy in Australia & India: what we can learn from each other - Ian Johnson
    • 16:00-16:15 - S040 - The anatomy of partnership (UNSW & Wits): challenges and perks - Carol Hartmann
    • 16:15-16:30 - S041 - BEST Network – creating, collaborating and sharing anatomy education resources internationally - Nicholas Hawkins

    *Anatomical Society Chair


    Immunological barriers form biological, mechanical, and chemical lines of defence which quietly, but vigorously protect the body from infection. These barriers include skin, tears, mucus, cilia, stomach acid, and “friendly” bacteria. If these barriers are compromised, pathogens or other foreign agents can penetrate the body and cause infection, sepsis, and even death.

    This symposium will review the histological and physiological characteristics of these barriers (mainly skin) and discuss educational resources available to assist faculty in teaching these concepts. In addition, integration of current discoveries on wound healing, novel regulators of this complex process, as well as the role these “friendly” bacteria (microbiome) play in tissue repair will be referenced.

    This symposium is supported by the American Association for Anatomy.

    Chaired by Martine Dunnwald and Adam Taylor*
    • S042 - Getting skin in the game: a lesson on the structure and function of the body’s innate physical barriers using open educational resources - Jamie Chapman
    • S043 - Regulation of inflammation in normal and impaired cutaneous wound healing - Kimberly Mace
    • S044 - The host microbiota axis in skin wound repair - Matthew Hardman

    *Anatomical Society Chair


     
     

    In this symposium, the cell biology of desmosomes with functional implications under physiologic and pathophysiologic conditions will be highlighted in different tissues and cell types. The symposium is a follow-up meeting to the symposium held at the IFAA meeting 2014 in Beijing. We plan to have 5 keynote talks on the structure and function of the desmosome-keratin complex in general as well as on its function in skin, heart muscle, intestinal epithelium and cancer cells with respect to tissue-specific diseases. The talks will cover the role of desmosomes in the pathogenesis of pemphigus, cardiomyopathy, Crohn's disease and oncogenesis. In addition, we will have short talks presenting recent data on the different sub-topics.

    This symposium is supported by Elsevier.

    Chaired by Jens Waschke, Friedrich Paulsen and Fabio Quondamatteo*

    • 14:30-15:00 - S045 - Desmosomes in cardiomyocytes and Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy - Jens Waschke
    • 15:00-15:15 - S046 - Dsg2 and heart disease - Sebastian Kant
    • 15:15-15:30 - S047 - Regulation of cardiomyocyte cohesion by autonomic nervous signaling - Sunil Yeruva
    • 15:30-16:00 - S048 - Desmosomes in the intestinal epithelium and Crohn's disease - Nicolas Schlegel
    • 16:00-16:30 - S049 - Desmosomes in cancer - Volker Spindler

    *Anatomical Society Chair


    Chaired by Clive Lee*

     

    • 15:30-15:42 - O021 - New fixation method in anatomy: Polymerization - Aysegul Gungor Aydin
    • 15:42-15:54 - O022 - Standardized reduction of formaldehyde emissions below the WHO threshold of 0,1mg/m³ during dissecting courses - Günther Weber
    • 15:54-16:06 - O023 - Alterations in the extracellular matrix in the obese human term myometrium - Peter Dockery
    • 16:06-16:18 - O025 - Form and function of the dolphin clitoris - Dara Orbach 
    *Anatomical Society Chair
     

     

    Chaired by Gerard O'Keeffe*

    • 14:30-14:42 - O011 - Calcification scarcely occurs in human atrioventricular nodal arteries in old age - Yoshiyuki Tohno
    • 14:42-14:54 - O012 - Combined endocrine and antiplatelet therapy fails to reduce platelet activation in breast cancer - Kutlwano Xulu
    • 14:54-15:06 - O013 - Tamoxifen and Anastrozole alters breast cancer cell-induced early platelet activation and associated ESR1 and ESR2 expression in vitro. - Kyrtania Pather
    • 15:06-15:18 - O014 - The role of efferent transmitters in taste bud signal transduction - Anthony Huang
    • 15:18-15:30 - O015 - Overcoming chemoresistance against Doxorubicin via combined inhibition of Tiam1/Rac1 and Notch in a Biomimetic 3D Lymphoma Model - Sik Yoon
    • 15:30-15:42 - O016 - Protective effects of fish collagen peptides against CoCl2- and TNF-α-induced cytotoxicity and inflammation in HaCaT cells via suppressing ROS/MAPK/NF-κB pathway - Ye Seon Lim
    • 15:42-15:54 - O017 - Neural crest-derived facial dermis in mouse has distinct tissue architecture - Tanya Shaw
    • 15:54-16:06 - O018 - Survivin – plausible tumor biomarker in colon adenomas - Marian Adamkov
    • 16:06-16:18 - O019 - Altered activity of the Wnt/Beta-catenin and BMP pathways mimics the skeletal phenotypes of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome in chick embryos - Benedict Turner
    • 16:18-16:30 - O020 - Micro teaching in anatomy: principles, procedures, benefits and limitations - Eva Nagy

    *Anatomical Society Chair


     
     

    The proposed workshop will bring together anatomists from around the world to share their interests in international work and Global Health (GH).

    The first portion of the workshop includes presentations from 7 anatomists of different backgrounds and countries – who will showcase snapshots of a broad variety of international projects and their contributions to GH and GH education. They will share how they established, built, maintained their partnerships/programs, obtained institutional support, and funded their work.

    The second portion of the workshop includes a hands-on “build your own GH program” exercise, where anatomists can meet in breakout sessions to address topics such as, how to 1) build a global network, 2) make the network/program sustainable, 3) involve students, 4) involve key stakeholders, 5) utilize modern technology, 6) obtain financial support, and 7) identify challenges, avoid pitfalls, and prevent mistakes.

    At the end of the workshop participants can team up to establish new collaborations and projects in GH.

    The speakers hope that the workshop will inspire other anatomists to work on GH issues. We desire to start an international GH support movement, anchored in the anatomical societies, and will discuss how associations like the IFAA can be involved with GH initiatives - thus, providing a new role for the field of Anatomy worldwide.

    Chaired by Anette Wu, Geoffroy Noel and Cecilia Brassett*

    • 14:30-14:35 - Multidirectional near peer training program between Haiti, Rwanda and Canada: values at home and abroad - Geoffroy Noel
    • 14:35-14:40 - How to leverage resources and secure funding for international partnerships - Chung-Liang Chien
    • 14:40-14:45 - Building bridges: medical education and anatomical sciences - Brazil and the US. - Daniella Curcio
    • 14:45-14:50 - Internationalization of medical education and the anatomy course – an international 12-school partnership - Anette Wu
    • 14:50-14:55 - The role of modern technology in changing anatomical education around the world - Michael Hortsch
    • 14:55-15:00 - Classroom without boundaries - Mamata Chimmalgi
    • 15:00- 15:05 - International outreach with school children: bringing school children from India and the UK together through imagined anatomies - Richard Wingate
    • 15:05 - 16:30 - Build you own GH program

    *Anatomical Society Chair


    Sectional and Imaging Anatomy is a science that specializes in the study of the human body's morphological structure and basic functions for the needs of imaging diagnostics, interventional radiology and minimally invasive surgery, and is the morphological basis for the radiologic diagnosis using medical imaging data e.g. CT and MRI images. With the advancement of multimodal data acquisition methods and the continuous development of image processing techniques, the study of sectional and imaging anatomy has entered a new stage. In order to promote the latest researches in this field and promote their application in diagnosis and treatment of diseases, we organized the seminar during the 19th congress of the IFAA. There were six lectures in this seminar, which comprehensively introduced the research progress of the sectional and Imaging anatomy of the main organs of the whole body, and discussed the potential applications of anatomical and neuroimaging techniques in clinical applications. It is designed to develop participants’ understanding of the recent advances in brain imaging, including human brain atlas, functional and structural MRI studies, and related applications in different brain diseases. Furthermore, we also arrange speakers to introduce current progresses of the Chinese visible Human Project. This seminar is organized by Young Anatomical Scientists of the Sectional and Image Subsociety of the Chinese Society for Anatomical Sciences (CSAS).

    This symposium is supported by The Young Anatomical Scientists Union of the Chinese Society for Anatomical Sciences (CSAS)

    Chaired by Yu-Chun Tang, Yong Liu and Flora Gröning*      

    • 14:30-14:50 - S050 - Brain structure differences between Chinese and Caucasian populations - Yu-Chun Tang
    • 14:50-15:10 - S051 - Human brainnetome atlas and its applications - Ling-Zhong Fan
    • 15:10-15:30 - S052 - Quantitative radiomic features of the hippocampus for Alzheimer’s disease: a multi-site MRI study.- Yong Liu
    • 15:30-15:50 - S053 - Multivariate classification analysis on the depressive disorders using connectivity measures - Jun-Hai Xu
    • 15:50-16:10 - S054 - Functional anatomy of pelvic floor based on Chinese Visible Human - Na Chen
    • 16:10-16:30 - S055 - Sectional anatomy and three-dimensional visulization of the posterolateral complex of the knee joint Based on undeformed high-resolution sectional anatomical images - Yan Song

    *Anatomical Society Chair


     

    Anatomy teachers use a plethora of assessment forms, mostly chosen by means of habit, tradition or technical possibilities. Sometimes they are not chosen at all but decided at a program level. Awareness about validity issues in assessment of anatomical competence leaves room for development. Most teachers ask questions about ‘what they need to know’, ‘will this student be a safe practioners next year?’. Such questions are probably based on a set of objectives, insuring some content validity, ensuring there is a clear demarcation between a pass and a fail. One of the big questions that remains unanswered is What students ‘do’ to produce an answer to a test questions. This symposium will explore the cognitive steps that students go through each time they face an anatomy assessment and what we, as educators, can do to assist students and produce valid assessments.

    The workshop will be introduced concisely by the three organisers. Then the participants will actively step in the shoes of students. They will experience their strain (maybe even their anxiety) while answering ‘anatomy’ exam questions about a surprising subject. After this portion of experiential learning, the three organisers will share their views on validity of anatomy assessment from their individual perspective.

    The aim of this workshop is to nurture awareness in anatomy teachers about the cognitive processes in student’s brains while answering exam questions. What do students do to generate the correct answer? For experts (teachers) the processes are quite different than for novices (students). These cognitive processes are key to assessing the validity of traditional and modern assessments methods.

    For session notes, please click here.

    Chaired by Marc Vorstenbosch and Asha Venkatesh*

    • 14:30-15:10 - Experimental learning: learning phase / Experimental learning: assessment phase
    • 15:10-15:20 - Plenary discussion - Exchange of experiences
    • 15:20-15:40 - Using images in single best answer examinations - Mandeep Sagoo
    • 15:40-16:00 - How to produce a valid spotter test and why to avoid viva’s - Claire Smith
    • 16:00-16:15 - Cognitive processes in medical students during exams and in clinical practice - Marc Vorstenbosch
    • 16:15-16:30 - Panel discussion

    *Anatomical Society Chair

     

    Wikipedia is the largest online encyclopaedia whose content is created by collaboration of over seven-million volunteers. It is among the most visited websites on the internet, and is read by 1.4 billion of people every month. Despite its popularity in the general public, Wikipedia has an immediate and real-world impact on global public health. Medical students, health care professionals, and even patients use Wikipedia to make health decisions. It was revealed that Wikipedia is used by 90% of medical students, and is ranked number one by 56% of medical students for their most preferred online anatomy resource. Also, Wikipedia is often the initial source of information for students and health professionals searching for quick information about anatomical structures. Wikipedia has received justifiable criticisms regarding the quality of its entries. There have been studies evaluating the accuracy and quality of Wikipedia articles across disciplines. Most of them found out that Wikipedia articles are generally accurate, albeit with some errors of omission. There are several ways in which academics can contribute to the Wikipedia ecosystem. The Education Programme is a platform that allows educators and students to contribute to Wikipedia in an academic setting. WikiJournal of Medicine was introduced as a bridge between the Wikipedia community and the academia. Content published in this journal is integrated into Wikipedia, and at the same time authors are rewarded with citable publications. In this symposium, the quality of Wikipedia articles across subjects in medicine especially in anatomy will be explored. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn how Wikipedia works, where it sits in modern education, different ways to contribute to Wikipedia and make an immediate impact on global public health.

     
    Chaired by Athikhun Suwannakhan and Iain Keenan*
    • 14:30-14:35 - Introduction to anatomy on Wikipedia and Wikipedia education programme - Athikhun Suwannakhan
    • 14:35-14:45 - Accuracy and quality of Wikipedia anatomy articles - Athikhun Suwannakhan
    • 14:45-15:15 - Contributing to Wikipedia, WikiProjects, and Wiki Journal of Medicine - Jacob F. de Wolff
    • 15:15-15:30 - Discussion

    *Anatomical Society Chair


     

    16:30 – 17:15

    Tea, posters and exhibition

    Posters
    Room: 14-16

    Posters: 

    • Anatomical Techniques P1-AT1 - P1-AT12
    • Cellular and Molecular Anatomy P1-CM1 - P1-CM37
    • General P1-G1 - P1-G38
    • Microscopic Anatomy P1-MA1 - P1-MA23
    • Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience P1-N1 - P1-N63
     

    16:45 – 18:45

    IFAA General Assembly

    IFAA Members Only
    Room: Plenary Hall

     

    The General Assembly of the IFAA is an imperative feature of the IFAA Congress that brings together elected representatives of member associations from around the globe to meet and discuss anatomy.
    At the General Assembly, the President and Office Bearers of the IFAA Executive Board will provide the anatomical community with a report on the progress made by the Federation and its Programmes and Committees over the past five years. Also, decisions will be taken by the Delegates of member associations on key issues such as:
    • Approval of applications for membership from anatomy associations wishing to join the IFAA
    • The election of members of the Executive Board and approval of nominations for Chairs of the Federative Programmes and Committees of the IFAA for the next five years.
    • The report of the Treasurer on the budget and balances of the IFAA
    • The venue for the IFAA Congress in 2024
    An announcement regarding the initiation of the “IFAA’s International Anatomy Week” will be made at the General Assembly, which will also provide an opportunity for discussions about the discipline of anatomy and mechanisms to support and grow the discipline to its fullest extent.

     

    *Anatomical Society Chair